New York Times: Ukraine used US intelligence data to plan a counteroffensive

The New York Times reported that the Ukrainian army was able to use US intelligence to identify key Russian targets and used them to plan a counteroffensive. The American daily emphasized that it is not yet clear what the strategic significance of the Ukrainian gains will be. The offensive, however, could be the beginning of actions that could distance the Russian front line.

According to the New York Times USA they deliver Ukraine information on Russian command posts, ammunition stockpiles, etc. This played a decisive role in planning and executing tasks such as targeting enemy forces, killing high-ranking generals, and forcing ammunition supplies to be moved further from the front lines.

As the newspaper noted earlier, US intelligence agents said they often had a better understanding of military plans Russia than Ukraine. This was due to the Ukrainians’ fears that sharing operational plans could highlight their weaknesses and discourage Americans from further support.

Soldiers on the liberated street as a result of a counteroffensive by Ukrainian troops IziumaPAP / Alena Solomonova

“But as Ukraine prepared its plans to strike against the Russians, leaders in Kiev decided that sharing more information with the United States would help them get more help,” writes the NYT based on intelligence sources.

Going on the offensive is more difficult than defending

The daily added that it is not yet clear what the strategic importance of the Ukrainian gains will be. The offensive, however, could be the beginning of actions that could distance the Russian front line.

The NYT cites the opinion of retired Lieutenant General Frederick B. Hodges, former commander-in-chief of the US Army in Europe. He admitted that Ukraine could regain territories in the south and east faster than he thought and pave the way for the recapture of Crimea next year.

Other representatives spoke in a similar vein Pentagon. They emphasized the benefits of training Ukrainians for eight years. At the same time, they admitted that it was too early to judge whether the Ukrainian army could maintain its gains.

“The offensive will burden the Ukrainians, who suffer from a supply shortage, especially artillery shells. Their army also suffered heavy losses. Going on the offensive is more difficult than defending and it is more difficult to maintain gains,” writes the NYT. He also refers to the warnings of US officials that the more successful Ukraine is, the more Russia will look for ways to retaliate.

Main photo source: PAP / Alena Solomonova

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